Tuesday, July 10, 2007

"Good evening."

Sound familiar? Alfred Hitchcock's famous opening line. One other thing Mr. Hitchcock was known for was appearing somewhere in all of his movies. Sometimes the cameo was so small, he was undetectable.

Seeing some lively debate about characters, got me thinking about cameos. I'm sure we have all based a character or two on a real life person. If not in full, at least a mannerism or two. How could you not? To have the flesh and blood illustration right in front of you to study while other people interact with them as a bonus, talk about making your life easy.

I know that I have used my son as a sub-character. Hmm, who else? Oh, yes, three friends of the family. One person in particular might not find this flattering. What can I say? Your personality is larger than life. My daughter? Not yet. Her personality doesn't fit well in the 1700's. A fact that she's not overly saddened about.

Now for the real question. Are you like Mr. Hitchcock and will make an appearance in your story? I know, I know. All of our characters have a glimpse of us in their makeup. But, is there anyone that is all you? For me, not yet. But wouldn't it be fun to do?

14 comments:

Jenny said...

Carol -

Just for you, a snip! *g*

********************

He turned his focus to the other passengers. Across the way sat a young family, not far from his own age: a husband and wife, and their young son. The man was strong and well-built, with close-cropped blonde hair and eyes as blue as Alec’s own. His wife bore a striking resemblance to Elspeth, with brown hair and dark eyes, and the sight twisted Alec’s heart. He didna mean to stare, but so long had he been without sight of his beloved that he could not help looking at her.

As if she felt his eyes on her, she turned and caught his gaze. Rather than frustration or annoyance, her countenance showed friendliness, almost recognition. She smiled at him, and he felt at peace. Then she turned back to her son, a bright little boy with his da’s looks but eyes and dimples like her own, and his heart clenched once more. There was the life he could have had, wife and son by his side.

Carol said...

Aw, Jenny. Thanks. (s)

You put the whole family in there. And what a nice way to do it. Mr. Hitchcock would be proud.

Susan Adrian said...

Carol:

Oddly enough, yes I did:

I eyed all the people, trying to guess who I was going to be doing crazy skits with and who was just there for a latte. The class notice hadn't been age-specific, so it could be anybody. The grizzled man with the Broncos cap, the librarian-looking woman in white Capris, the Goth girl with pink hair. But I was really hoping for at least someone my age.

Guess which one I am? {g}

Jen said...

Carol,

The only person to do a little cameo in any of my books so far is my grandfather. He's the handsome fella you get a _brief_ glimpse of at the end of this snip.

Jen

**

A man got up from one of the folding chairs pushed against the wall and passed by us. What the hell? The guy looked like my grandfather, only… older. Balding silver hair covered his age-spotted scalp, while a few strands shot out willy-nilly from his ears. His pants, hiked up to mid-chest, were belted and showed white socks over sensible black shoes. He grinned at me as he walked by, slipping his uppers out and back in with one fluid motion. Gross. Another older gentleman came into view, this one with a huge belly harnessed by a pair of suspenders.

Carol said...

Hi Susan,
Oh, you guys make this sound like too much fun. I have to place myself in my book somewhere.

Which one are you? Well, it would be terrific if you are the Goth girl with pink hair. But somehow, with your job, mmm, I can't quite see that flying. Capri's it is.

Come on, Susan. Not even with the wash out spray color? One picture. You know, for fun. I'll go blue if you go pink. (w)

Carol said...

Hi Jen,

Am I ever glad your grandfather was the second guy. How nice to put him in there. Does he know? I think he would get a kick out of knowing he has become immortal.

Susan Adrian said...

There ya go, Carol. I changed it for a day, just for you. {bg}

Jen said...

Carol,

No, he doesn't know. My grandfather doesn't pleasure read.

Umm, he's always saying how he's wasting away, so I somehow doubt he would even recognize himself in the book. LOL. He's had that stomach as long as I can remember...yet he's starving. He looks pregnant, for goodness sakes.

No one really recognizes him -- it's a small mention that only I really know about -- but it makes me smile every time I read it.

Jen

Carol said...

Hi Jen,

Sometimes those hidden secrets are the best.

Carol said...

Okay, Susan,

I didn't leave you hanging. Oh, yeah. We're cool! hehehe

Susan Adrian said...

Carol:

LOLOLOL!

Jane Richardson, writer said...

Hiya Carol, good question! Is there anyone that's ALL me? Hmmm....not all, but large chunks of me. Alarmingly large chunks, come to think of it! Many of which I truly didn't notice till my CP pointed them out, and that was weird. Spooky. It's a really interesting question...I'm sure writers do use their own deepest experiences much more than they care to admit, because, well...who else's experience can they use? Sure, you can shape a character from the outside in, give them a story, a life, right down to the smallest detail, but I'm sure when it comes to their deepest thoughts we use our own perspectives and experiences, even if we disguise them for the story. As to having other people in there, I refuse to answer that one on the grounds of incrimination. They might sue!!
Jane x

Carol said...

Hi Jane,

LOL. I'm sure every writer has friends and family always trying to decifer who each character is in their book.

After hearing all the fun these other ladies have slipping into their story, I have to find a spot for me. Come on, you know you want to.

Jane Richardson, writer said...

What, find a spot for you? Watch out!! LOL
J x